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Japanese people are living so long that the country’s definition of "elderly" could change

日本人超長壽 改寫全國「老年」定義

· 每日跟讀單元 Daily English

The Japanese Gerontological Society, a group of medical doctors and university professors, have proposed changing the threshold for "elderly" status from 65 years old to 75 given the country’s widespread longevity, NHK World reports.

日本放送協會環球廣播網報導,由於日本人普遍長壽,一群醫師和大學教授組成的日本老年學會,提議將「老年」的門檻從65歲調整至75歲。

Census figures from 2015 show 26.7% of Japan’s population is 65 years or older. The proportion will rise to 33% by 2035 and 40% by 2060.

2015年的人口普查數據顯示,年紀在65歲(含)以上的日本人占26.7%。這個比例2035年將上升至33%,2060年將高達40%。

Economists have expressed concern over the widespread aging because younger generations aren’t having children like they used to. With fewer young people to cover greater social-security costs, people are taking on larger individual shares, limiting their personal spending.

經濟學家已對老年化現象普及表達憂心,因為年輕世代不像過去一樣生養後代。一旦缺少年輕人負擔愈來愈龐大的社會福利支出,個人所須扛下的費用就會增加,從而限制每個人的消費能力。

Redefining "elders" over 75 instead of 65 would allow more older Japanese people in great physical shape to continue contributing to the labor force, and hopefully boost the economy.

將「老年」定義從65歲調升至75歲,可讓更多身體狀態良好的年長日本人,繼續貢獻勞動力,希望藉此促進經濟發展。

According to the Japan Times, a recent survey conducted by the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry found, 70% of respondents who are 60 or older would be willing to work past 65.

日本時報指出,厚生勞動省近期一項調查發現,60歲以上的人當中,有70%願意工作至65歲之後。

Source article: http://iservice.ltn.com.tw/Service/english/english.php?engno=1080588&day=2017-02-23

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